Learning By Doing

Learning by doing is what I know. The willingness to accept failure a large part of the learning process. I read and study about photography every day. However I gain the most improvement through trial and error. Many times thinking a certain setting or rule is what I need to use, then finding out, no those ideas need to be adjusted.

For example reading from the pros can help but the majority of those folks use top of the line equipment. Which I doubt I will ever use. Simply can’t afford it or justify the expense if I could. Of course the best equipment does not necessarily make for great images. It does make it easier. The above image was shot at ISO 12,800 Shutter speed of 400, Aperture at 6.3. I have never read any article saying to shoot at that high an ISO. But I see a lot of cool stuff on cloudy days in light rain before sunrise time. Somehow I gotta learn how to shoot in that light I have told myself. So I keep trying and slowly I am gaining that ability.

It occurred to me that if the camera I use has a setting it is there for a reason. Using all the thousands of settings and options on a modern dsl camera takes a ton of time. Time I got at present. Being out and learning from nature is my thing. The camera offering me the chance to capture what the naked eye can not.

The past few days photographing in far from ideal light has been yet another learning experience. In the past I more than likely would have stayed at home. Using the excuse the light is too bad. Not accepting that, I have got to see a lot of neat stuff. After all my subjects can’t decide to stay indoors cause the light is bad or its raining.

Enough of the camera jargon. Don’t reckon most folks visit to hear that stuff. The photos in today’s post are mostly from yesterday but quite a few leftovers from the past couple days. I could have saved some and took a day off, but prefer to accept the challenge each day of finding subjects or attempting to use another setting on the camera. On the off chance I might learn something. Figured I better put the leftovers up or they will be forgotten. I strive to share quality images. Don’t expect to be the best photographer around, but do wish to get people interested in the wildlife world. Look what you can see if you slow down and take the time to appreciate what nature has to offer. All for free except for your time…

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Today’s Flashback Photo

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10 Responses to Learning By Doing

  1. Ellen Bunnell says:

    Funny, but I find your details about cameras and photography fascinating. It hints at the how of detail you manage to capture. Love the pelicans lined up on the edge of the water, looking like a bunch of people trying with just feet to see how cold the water is and one brave soul that just drove in to get the plunge over with fast. But of course, they are lined up to go after the fish some other pelican has caught. The entire stream of photos is fun to imagine. And the stream of pix of the eagle carrying more grass in for the nest in great.

    • Jim says:

      Ellen Bunnell,
      Glad I did not bore you with the camera stuff. Thank You for the compliment. Wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas and joyful holiday season…

  2. Mary Anne Nelson says:

    Merry Christmas to you and your family from the Tree House Eagle Blog!…Don’t worry about the pros and their equipment. Your photos are excellent. The best for color ,content,and action (love the way you catch them doing what eagles do)..I look forward every day to see your treasures..some take my breath away. “I love Goat Sass Farm!” is a comment I hear often from our members..Happy Hollidays! Thanks -Mary Anne -admin

    • Jim says:

      Mary Anne Nelson,
      Merry Christmas to you and yours and the Tree House Eagle Blog. Thank You for the compliments. Happy Hollidays to you as well….

  3. Mary S says:

    Jim, Yes, you are right; learning by doing is the best. Those Pelicans can really get into a fight, it seems. Looks “not nice” kind of fight too. Who knew?
    The eagle surely caught a big fish! Then went for a “dessert”, stopped for a drink, then home to chill and perch and watch the world go by.
    The little bird with the big fish! (a Kingfisher????? I’m guessing out of nowhere on that) surely has enuf to eat for the day.
    A very happy Christmas to you and all yours! MCS

    • Jim says:

      Mary S,
      The pelicans do battle for every scrap of food. They require a 20-40 percent of their body weight a day. They weigh around 15 lbs. so if my math is good they need to eat around 4lbs a day. I have seen as many as three adults and on juvenile at that fish carcass. Of course I did not see them feed on it yesterday like the day before. So I did not use a cautious approach and spooked them all before I got a shot. One juvenile did come back and I captured it feeding. Yes, it is a kingfisher and they can eat that size fish fast. I missed it swallowing it in one gulp. Merry Christmas to you as well…

  4. I couldn’t agree more; people could see so much more of nature if they simply slowed down.
    Amazing shots of the pelican biting the other. I guess they’ll do just about anything for food.
    Another great shot of the kingfisher!

    • Jim says:

      New Hampshire Gardener,
      Even I have to remind myself sometimes to slow down. The pelicans are very aggressive going after food. Thank You. Wishing you the best holiday season…

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